Ways to Prevent Bacteria and Food Spoilage

March 22, 2011 by  
Filed under Healthy Eating Tips


Eating healthy foods will help you to boost your immune system, but what if it’s the foods themselves making you sick? Food born illness can cause food poisoning and a variety of other more dangerous diseases, so they are a real threat to our bodies. Luckily, there are a number of things you can do to prevent food bacteria and food borne illnesses. Following safety tips when handling, preparing, and for food storage are very important.

Digital thermometerFirst and foremost, you should be concerned with the temperature of your foods. When cooking meat, make sure to use a thermometer in order to make sure that you meat is reaching to proper temperatures inside. Some meats, like beef, can be served rare safely, but proper temperatures are crucial. This kills any bacteria that may be growing on the meat. In the case of burger and other loaf meats that have been ground and formed into eating healthy foods will help you to boost your immune system, but what if it’s the foods themselves making you sick? Food born illness can cause food poisoning and a variety of other more dangerous diseases, so they are a real threat to our bodies. Luckily, there are a number of things you can do to prevent food borne illnesses. Following safety tips when handling, preparing, and storing food is very important.

Some meats, like beef, can be served rare safely, but proper temperatures are crucial. This kills any bacteria that may be growing on the meat. In the case of burger and other loaf meats that have been ground and formed into patties, you should not eat rare meals. The bacterium is easily found inside the meat as well as on the outside, and you are at risk if you do not cook these meats for a long period of time to kill any bacteria.

 

After your food is cooked, you should continue to monitor temperature. Simply put, keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. Hot foods should be kept at temperatures above 140 degrees Fahrenheit, while cold foods should be kept at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. The range between that is where bacteria can grow. When letting food cool for refrigeration, place in the refrigerator after no more than two hours and when thawing meals, do so in a bowl or pan in the refrigerator, rather than at room temperature.

Cross contamination is a huge culprit when you are concerned with preventing illness and your food. Cross contamination is basically the moving of bacteria from one dish to another. This happens when you use dirty cutting boards, don’t wish your dishes properly, and use the same utensil for all of your foods. If you use, for example, a knife to cut raw chicken and then use that same knife to cut your food after it has been cooked, some of the bacteria from the raw chicken have probably remained on the knife, which can make you very ill. Make sure that you are using a clean work space and clean tools whenever you cook.

Along with using a clean environment, you should make sure that you are washing you hands regularly. Every time you touch raw foods, you should use disinfecting hand soap and hot water to make sure that no bacteria remains on your hands. Making sure that your food is safe is one of the most important parts of healthy eating, so don’t overlook this step the next time you prepare a meal. The bacterium is easily found inside the meat as well as on the outside, and you are at risk if you do not cook these meats for a long period of time to kill any bacteria.

New ways to fight food bacteria (Science Alert)

Scientists have found specific sugar molecules in the human body that can initiate or advance food poisoning.

Publish Date: 03/17/2011 3:00

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20111803-21966-2.html

Drug-resistant Bacteria and Your Food

Drug-resistant Bacteria and Your Food. By Monica Potts | Posted 03/16/2011 at 09:40 AM · Via Grist, Maryn McKenna at Wired highlights a new study about the increasingly terrifying affects of using so many antibiotics in factory farms: …

Publish Date: 03/16/2011 10:40

http://prospect.org/csnc/blogs/tapped_archive?month=03&year=2011&base_name=drugresistant_bacteria_and_you

Poison Party – putrid gumbo served « US Food Safety

Could it be safe to eat spoiled food? There were warning signs. After stirring a quintuple batch of roux for a full hour, hacking apart dozens of alliums and a 5-pound kielbasa, and sluicing in 10 quarts of chicken stock

Publish Date: 08/10/2011 13:48

http://blog.usfoodsafety.com/2011/08/10/poison-party-putrid-gumbo-served/

Healthy Housekeeping – Food Storage « Clean Home, Healthy Home
If you’ve had any of these items in your food storage areas – or even if you haven’t – it may be time for cleaning the food storage areas of your kitchen. In these challenging economic times, you don’t want to waste food

Publish Date: 08/10/2011 11:20

http://cleanexpectations.wordpress.com/2011/08/10/healthy-housekeeping-food-storage/

Safe meat-cooking temperatures changed | Rural Messenger

In May 2011 the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced new recommendations that include fewer numbers to remember when cooking meats safely. Research has shown that pork cooked to a lower temperature and held

Publish Date: 08/06/2011 17:01

http://www.ruralmessenger.com/24455/safe-meat-cooking-temperatures-changed.html

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